“Leaving no one behind”: COVID-19 Response in Black Canadian Communities

Authors

  • Josephine Etowa University of Ottawa
  • Bagnini Kohoun Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
  • Egbe B. Etowa Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
  • Getachew Kiros Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
  • Ikenna Mbagwu Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
  • Mwali Muray University of Ottawa
  • Charles Dabone University of Ottawa
  • Lovelyn Ubangha Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
  • Hilary Nare Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25071/2291-5796.84

Keywords:

COVID-19, marginalized, Canadians of African Descent, healthcare, pandemic

Abstract

Despite the universal healthcare system in Canada, Canadians of African Descent (CAD) still face numerous problems that place them at higher risk to pandemics such as COVID-19. From the struggles of working as frontline workers, to challenges compounded by pre-existing chronic medical conditions such as Diabetes, CAD may face unique issues, further weighing on their existing and potential health outcomes. This situation calls for closer attention to the specific needs of CAD who may be at greater risk of late diagnosis and delayed treatment for COVID-19. Historically, marginalized communities such as CAD must be included in healthcare considerations and planning, so as to avoid further leaving them behind during and after the storm. Past evidence has shown that structural inequities shape who is affected by disease and its economic fallout. Therefore, the unique needs of CAD must be considered in healthcare planning with the ongoing COVID-19 response.

Keywords: pandemic, marginalized, healthcare, COVID-19, Canadians of African Descent

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Author Biographies

Josephine Etowa, University of Ottawa

Professor,
Faculty of Health Sciences,
451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Fax Number: (613) 562-5443

Bagnini Kohoun, Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)

Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
451 Smyth Road, Office: 1118K, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Telephone Number: 613-562-5800, ext. 7671

Egbe B. Etowa, Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)

Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
451 Smyth Road, Office: 1118K, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Telephone Number: 613-562-5800, ext. 7671

Getachew Kiros, Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)

Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
451 Smyth Road, Office: 1118K, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Telephone Number: 613-562-5800, ext. 7671

Ikenna Mbagwu, Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)

Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
451 Smyth Road, Office: 1118K, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Telephone Number: 613-562-5800, ext. 7671

Mwali Muray, University of Ottawa

Faculty of Health Sciences,
451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Fax Number: (613) 562-5443

Charles Dabone, University of Ottawa

Faculty of Health Sciences,
451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Fax Number: (613) 562-5443

Lovelyn Ubangha, Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)

Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
451 Smyth Road, Office: 1118K, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Telephone Number: 613-562-5800, ext. 7671

Hilary Nare, Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)

Canadians of African Descent Health Organization (CADHO)
451 Smyth Road, Office: 1118K, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada
Telephone Number: 613-562-5800, ext. 7671

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Published

2020-12-30

How to Cite

Etowa, J., Kohoun, B., Etowa, E. B., Kiros, G., Mbagwu, I., Muray, M., Dabone, C., Ubangha, L., & Nare, H. (2020). “Leaving no one behind”: COVID-19 Response in Black Canadian Communities. Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, 2(2), 124–130. https://doi.org/10.25071/2291-5796.84
Received 2020-08-24
Accepted 2020-09-17
Published 2020-12-30