Call for Submissions

                   Call for Papers Volume 4(1) - 

             See* it, Speak it, Write it, Change it.

Witness readers, editors, reviewers, supporters and contributors form a collective of critical nurses in Canada and beyond who strive to ameliorate inequities in the health and quality of life of all. By virtue of nursing’s privileged societal position, we witness a wide array of inequities that require us to take action. Our tag line represents the ethos of the journal: “See* it .... Speak it .... Write it .... Change it ....

We are pleased, then,  to draw on our tag line as our inspiration for an open Call for Papers that reflects the ethos and intent of the journal.

Submission examples may include but are not limited to:

  • Nurse Activism- examples, barriers, facilitators
  • Whistle Blowing in Nursing and health care
  • Rebel Nurses then and now
  • Critical Research Methodologies
  • Examples of/Calls for Resistance in Nursing
    • Anti-Oppression Nursing Efforts: Past or Present
  • Policy Advocacy by Nursing
  • Disruptive Innovations in Nursing Research, Practice or Education
  • Critical Pedagogy/Education for Social Change
  • Intersectional Analyses of Health or Quality of Life
  • Critical Analyses of Power in the context of Health, Quality of Life, or Nursing
  • Health (In)Equity
  • Social Justice Nursing
  • Decolonizing Nursing
  • Linguistic Hegemony and Resistance
  • Critical Community Health Nursing
  • Critical Disability lenses and practices in nursing
  • other? - Feel free to contact the editor to discuss a potential piece, and include a proposed abstract

Submissions are to be nurse-authored or if submitted by a team, the lead author must be a nurse. Submission formats may include arts-based knowledge translation, practice-based research-based, or review manuscripts.  First-person narrative is welcomed and encouraged. For author guidelines, please see www.yorku.ca/witness. For any questions including to discuss a proposed submission, don’t hesitate to contact us at witness@yorku.ca

 Deadline for Submission through our online portal: January 3rd, 2022

Note: Prospective authors must register with the journal in order to submit their work. Please be sure to submit, upload and populate all required elements at the time of submission. 

 

* Rather than imply an ableist bias, “See it…” is intended to incorporate the multiple ways nurses experience/witness injustices.

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                           Nursing (on) a Sick Planet:

      Critical Consciousness and Action in a

                    Time of Planetary Decline

 2021-03-01 - Posted.
 

The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse is pleased to announce a special issue exploring Nursing’s role in sustainability and planetary health. As one of the largest and most trusted professional workforces in Canada, nurses can have significant influence in climate change discourse and action. It has long been within the nurses’ professional mandate to address issues concerning environmental health and today, that mandate extends to sustainability, climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. Through critical consciousness raising, action and system transformation, Nurses and nursing can and must work to affect meaningful and sustained change.

Firm DeadlineJuly 1st, 2021

Guest Editors 

June Kaminski, RN, PhD (c) Faculty & Curriculum Coordinator, Faculty of Health, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Wanda Martin RN, PhD Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan

 

Intended Focus of this Special Issue

It has been more than a decade since the Canadian Nurses Association (2009) put out a position statement calling on nurses to recognize and take action on the health risks of climate change and since has called on nurses to advocate, research, engage, and promote environmental health as a key element to ethical practice (CNA, 2017). The nursing profession is experiencing a paradigm shift towards a larger environmental context, as nurses witness the ever- increasing destructive land use, pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions that ignore gross inequities in environmental burdens and brings us closer to catastrophic consequences (Kurth, 2017). It is essential that the public collectively and more specifically, nurses as health leaders, critically explore the nature of these global challenging problems and find the courage and capacity to lead society to a healthy future. This special issue invites nurses to dive into the complexities of the ecological determinants of health and consider essential concepts such as environmental justice; activism and advocacy; sustainability; power and privilege; and ecological, and systems-based approaches as they relate to nursing. We invite transformative insights and discussions related to how nurses can advance understanding of the ecological determinants of health and, more broadly, how we engage with our planet. Inclusion of Indigenous perspectives and knowledge are encouraged and warmly welcomed.

 

Potential topics, approaches and lenses

  • Adaptation/ Deep Adaptation
  • Climate Justice
  • Connections between local, national, and global environmental health
  • Ecofeminism and nursing
  • Ecoliteracy for/by nurses
  • Ecological determinants of health
  • Environmental justice
  • Critical Environmental Education in nursing
  • Environment as a shifting paradigm in nursing
  • Food Sovereignty
  • Human Rights to water, food, and a healthy environment
  • Indigenous Knowledges/wisdom and many ways of knowing
  • Indigenous health nursing and planetary well-being
  • Just Transitions
  • Nursing advocacy and activism
  • Nursing roles in environmental health
  • One Planet Living
  • Political ecology
  • Power and politics
  • (Re) Connecting with the natural world
  • Sustainability literacy and competencies
  • System transformation
  • Systems and ecological approaches to health
  • Toxin regulation and exposure

Guidelines for Authors:

Submissions are to be nurse-authored or if submitted by a team, the lead author must be a nurse. Manuscripts should have a clear relevance to nursing. Additionally, Witness requires adherence to our authorship criteria, found at https://witness.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/default/AuthReq

Prospective authors must also familiarize themselves with the author guidelines set out in the journal found here:  https://witness.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/default/about/submissions . Undergraduate Student submissions are welcomed, and such submissions are to be supported/mentored by a nursing faculty member, and indicated in the cover letter signed by both the UG student and the faculty member.                                                                                                                                                                  

Note: All required materials must be submitted through the journal’s online portal at www.yorku.ca/witnessfollowing the journal’s and the council on publication ethics’ guidelines including those associated with authorship, conflict of interest etc. Please ensure author teams review our webpage. Lastly, prospective authors must register with the journal in order to submit their work.

For any questions regarding the journal or this call for papers including a desire to discuss a proposed submission not included in the introductory list of possible topics and foci, please don’t hesitate to contact the editor, Dr. Cheryl van Daalen-Smith at witness@yorku.ca . The deadline is firm.

LINK TO PDF OF THE CALL

References

Canadian Nurses Association. (2009). Climate change and health: A position statement. Retrieved from https://www.cna-aiic.ca/∽/media/cna/page-content/pdf-en/ps100_climate_change_e.pdf

Canadian Nurses Association. (2017). Nurses and environmental health. Retrieved from https://www.cna-aiic.ca/~/media/cna/page-content/pdf-en/nurses-and-environmental-health-position-statement.pdf

Kurth, A. E. (2017). Planetary Health and the Role of Nursing: A Call to Action. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 49(6), 598-605. https://doi.org/10.1111/jnu.12343

 

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                          DISRUPTING NURSING:

   Towards Anti-Racist and Decolonial Practice.

                           Call for Papers Vol 3(1) 

 

                                    DISRUPTING NURSING: Towards Anti-Racist and Decolonial Practice

                                                                    CALL FOR PAPERS VOL 3(1)

The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse is pleased to announce a special issue on critical anti-racism practice, including clinical, research, leadership and policy making practice. Racism is a pressing moral concern, embedded in colonial, imperial and capitalist foundations that are created, sustained and redeployed by systemic ruling relations. This issue builds upon a heightened global awakening of the interpersonal and structural violence of racism, inviting critical discourse regarding anti-racist nursing.

DeadlineFebruary 14th, 2021

Intended Focus of this Special Issue

In the aftermath of our collective witnessing of dehumanizing violence exemplified by the racism-provoked deaths of George Floyd and Joyce Echaquan, the focus of this call for papers is critical perspectives on anti-racist nursingDisrupting Nursing is an invitation to nurses and allies to engage in critical discourse about nursing’s complicit role in perpetuating the structural violence of White supremacy, White privilege and racism, and to explore opportunities for the integration of anti-racist, anti-oppressive praxis to advance social justice. Specifically, we encourage dialogue that promotes and provokes action toward nursing’s moral imperative to move beyond inclusion of diverse ways of being, knowing, and doing (Andreotti et al., 2015), and to enact paths of resistance. This special issue challenges the historical, economic and sociopolitical discourses of race and racism, including how “the dynamics of racism and racial superiority are fundamental to ongoing colonisation” (Varcoe, Browne & Garneau, 2019, p. 251).

Nursing’s response to critically analyzing racism, while challenging colonization, is slow but unfolding. There is growing curiosity and commitment to expose nursing’s complicit role in maintaining and reproducing racist and colonial harms. This special issue is a call for nurses, and our entire disciplinary governance structures, to confront systematic marginalizing and racializing practices. This special issue intentionally seeks to provide an opportunity to promote understandings of the lived experiences and perspectives of racialized peoples through anti-racism, anti-oppression, and decolonizing lenses, while respecting the ethical space of engagement (Ermine, 2007). An intersectionality lens is encouraged, and submissions may include perspectives such as critical race theory, critical feminist perspectives, post-colonial perspectives, post-humanist perspectives, queer theory, transgender theory, and critical disability studies.

 

Some questions prospective authors/teams might consider:

  • How do nurses make personal, institutional and structural racism visible? What are the consequences of the continued enactment of colonialism in nursing and how does it impact individuals, families, communities, and nations? How do racism and intergenerational colonialist acts, such as Indigenous genocide and Canada’s legacies of Anti-Black slavery, intersect to shape the lived experiences of racialized peoples? And how does this intersection further reinforce health care systems as pivotal sites of recolonization, including the primacy of profit over people and the planet?
  • Given that nursing is historically and currently complicit in the production and reproduction of racial inequities, how do nurses, and especially nursing governance systems, understand and confront the roles nursing plays in perpetuating injustices? How might nurses, individually and collectively, engage in leadership and activism to ensure health equity for racialized peoples?
  • In what ways does recognizing and/or denying colonialism help to enact/deactivate decolonization and/or advance/erase ways of being, knowing and doing for racialized peoples?
  • Where do White privilege and White supremacy fit into anti-racist nursing practice and leadership? How can White nurses expose and address performance activism, and move to take action in allyship?

Potential topics may include but are not limited to:

  • explorations and critical analyses regarding nursing’s complicity in racist and anti-Indigenous discourse in practice (e.g., clinical, research, leadership and policy making practice)?
  • making White privilege and White supremacy visible in nursing education, research, policy making and leadership practice
  • creating positive change in education to address anti-Indigenous racism.
  • exploring worldviews that foster relational accountability and anti-oppressive praxis, drawing on knowledge and wisdom of nursing thought leaders from Indigenous, Black and racialized communities
  • uncovering and addressing structural racism in healthcare policies and practices
  • identifying barriers and facilitators of anti-racist nursing practice
  • challenging the dominance of Eurocentric evidence-based clinical practice
  • addressing the issue of assimilation of “othered” knowledge in contemporary healthcare systems and practices; engaging respectfully with “othered” knowledge systems
  • challenging cognitive imperialism and the domination of nursing’s domain of human-centric worldviews
  • analyzing practical strategies in critical anti-racist nursing education and mentorship

 

Manuscripts from students, clinicians, educators, researchers, administrators, and policy makers are welcome. Undergraduate Student submissions are welcomed, and such submissions are to be supported/mentored by a nursing faculty member, and this must be indicated in the cover letter.

Guidelines for Authors:

Submissions are to be nurse-authored or if submitted by a team, the lead author must be a nurse. Manuscripts should have a clear relevance to nursing. Additionally, Witness requires adherence to our authorship criteria, found at https://witness.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/default/AuthReq

Prospective authors must also familiarize themselves with the author guidelines set out in the journal found here:  https://witness.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/default/about/submissions .

FIRM DeadlineFebruary 14th, 2021

                                                                                                                                                                   

Note: All required materials must be submitted through the journal’s online portal at www.yorku.ca/witnessand adhere to journal’s and the Council on Publication Ethics’ guidelines including those associated with authorship, conflict of interest, originality etc. Please ensure author teams review our guidelines regarding ethical publication practices and manuscript development. Lastly, prospective authors must register with the journal in order to submit their work.

For any questions regarding the journal or this call for papers including a desire to discuss a proposed submission not included in the introductory list of possible topics and foci, please don’t hesitate to contact the editor, Dr. Cheryl van Daalen-Smith at witness@yorku.ca

 

References

Andreotti, V.d.O., Stein, S., Ahenakew, C. & Hunt, D. (2015). Mapping interpretations of decolonization in the context of higher education. Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, 4(1), 21-40. https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/des/article/view/22168

Battiste, M. (2019). Battiste, M. (2019). Empowering Indigenization Symposium. Mount Royal University. Calgary, Canada. May 13, 2019.

Canadian Nurses Association (2015). Framework for the practice of registered nurses in Canada. https://cna-aiic.ca/-/media/cna/page-content/pdf-en/framework-for-the-pracice-of-registered-nurses-in-canada.pdf?la=en&hash=55716DC66A8C15D13972F9E45BE4AC7AE0461620

Ermine, W. (2007). The ethical space of engagement. Indigenous Law Journal, 6(1), 193-203.

Varcoe, C., Browne, A., & Garneau, A.B. (2019). Beyond stress and coping: the relevance of critical theoretical perspectives to conceptualising racial discrimination in health  research. Health Sociology Review, 28(3), 245-260. DOI: 10.1080/14461242.2019.1642124

 

For a PDF of the Call for Papers click here

                                                                             

 

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                                                                               Call for Papers

                                                                                  2020 Vol 2(2)

                                                                  Power, Discourse and Resistance:

                                            Critical Perspectives on Mental Health and Mental Health Nursing

The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse is pleased to announce a special issue exploring the myriad ways that current discourses in mental health care and mental health nursing can produce or reinforce precarious mental health and emotional distress or that create damaging identities for those who experience psychological difficulties thereby leading to stigmatization, marginalization and exclusion. It also seeks to make visible those discourses and practices that challenge these harmful processes and promote a more just and inclusionary world.

Guest Editors

Dave Holmes, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor, School of Nursing, University of Ottawa

Amélie Perron, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, University of Ottawa

 

 Intended Focus of this Special Issue

This Special Issue aims to foster and bring together critical perspectives on matters that directly or indirectly relate to contemporary notions of mental health and mental illness, and the way these notions suffuse everyday life. It seeks to promote scholarship that brings forth the complex intersections of sex, gender, race, class, age and ability and their effects on persons’ capacity to conform to various expectations. Such expectations may include for example the need for self-management, self-work and individual transformation; entrepreneurship; or ensuring one’s (socioeconomic) relevance in contemporary societies through proper patterns of performance, choice, consumption and competition. Such expectations are neither neutral nor inconsequential. For many individuals, groups and communities, they predetermine discourses of normality, acceptance and inclusion on the one hand, and of abnormality, rejection and exclusion on the other. They also fix corresponding identities in ways that both open up and close off opportunities for representation, recognition, justice and equity.

Making sense of the above is key to understanding two distinct but interrelated phenomena: the growing pathologization of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours, and the parallel downplaying of systems of discrimination and oppression that undermine human agency, personhood and connectedness, leaving only individual explanations of mental distress centered around ‘deficits’. The language of mental health and illness suffuses everyday life in such a way that every emotion brought on by the struggles or pleasures of life can become a symptom to be clinically managed and treated. In short, every individual can be subject to an expert evaluation of whether their thinking and functioning falls within social expectations and norms. Such thinking can be difficult to identify and problematize. It determines the way we perceive ourselves, our capacities and decisions, how we resolve problems, and how we categorize our responses to everyday occurrences. It also changes the way we perceive others around us, in particular those who think and act outside the realm of ‘normal’. Yet ‘normal’ is a moving target, spurred by multiple forces ranging from free-market policies and pressures to human rights discourses. Defining ‘normal’ is therefore a powerful act—but so is challenging the social, economic, scientific and legal foundations of such definitions.

There is a need to question those discourses, practices, institutions and laws that shape the realities of persons who experience emotional difficulties and/or who are constructed as mentally ill. We believe there is also a need to challenge and rethink the way certain agents, such as nurses, are called upon to intervene on those individuals deemed to pose a problem because of their mental state. Nurses practice at the intersection of individual and collective experience, state objectives, clinical guidelines and scientific evidence. They play a key role in the way current configurations of care and support can perpetuate or disrupt patterns of suffering, exclusion and violence. In other words, they are unequivocally bound to people’s experiences of mental health and illness. Nursing scholarship in this area is thus critical in order to shape a healthcare agenda that is respectful of people’s agency and personhood. We therefore hope this Special Issue can contribute meaningfully to the discussion, toward the full realization of social justice, equity and human dignity in mental health work.

Suggested Topics

For this Special Issue, manuscripts on the following themes are of particular interest:

  • Critical examinations of current constructions of mental health and emotional wellbeing;
  • Discursive shifts in the identification and management of persons experiencing emotional difficulties;
  • Critical analyses expanding markets for ‘psy’ work (e.g. children, students; trans persons);
  • Neuro-speak in health policy, research and education discourses;
  • (Im)possibilities of care: Blurring of care and coercion in the management of emotional difficulties;
  • Promises and pitfalls of techno-medicine in mental health work;
  • Role of the media and social media in the psychiatrization of society;
  • Ontologies and epistemologies of the psychiatrized body/mind;
  • Spaces and places of inclusion and exclusion of persons experiencing emotional difficulties;
  • Identity and subjectivity construction in mental health;
  • The politics of legitimacy in the development of evidence informing mental health work;
  • Examples and meanings of allyship in mad advocacy;
  • Counter discourses and resistant practices in mental health nursing;
  • Counter-hegemonic curriculum in undergraduate nursing;
  • Radical approaches in mental health research.

Note: Undergraduate Student or New Graduate Nurse submissions are welcomed, and such submissions are to be supported/mentored by a nursing faculty member, and this must be indicated in the cover letter. Graduate student submissions will be vetted through the typical processes.

Guidelines for Authors:

Submissions are to be nurse-authored or if submitted by a team, the lead author must be a nurse. Manuscripts should have a clear relevance to nursing.

Prospective authors must also familiarize themselves with the author guidelines set out in the journal found here:  https://witness.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/default/about/submissions

Firm DeadlineJuly 1st, 2020 

 

Note:

Priority will be given to prospective authors who have not published with Witness in the past. All required materials must be submitted through the journal’s online portal at www.yorku.ca/witness, following the journal’s and the council on publication ethics’ guidelines including those associated with authorship, conflict of interest etc. Please ensure author teams review our webpage. Lastly, prospective authors must register with the journal in order to submit their work.

For any questions regarding the journal or this call for papers including a desire to discuss a proposed submission, please don’t hesitate to contact the editor, Dr. Cheryl van Daalen-Smith at witness@yorku.ca

 

 

 

 

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Call for Papers  2020 Vol 2 (1) 

                                                                Special 2020 Guest Edited Issue:

                                          Nīpawīstimatowin -“bearing witness for one another”

The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse is pleased to announce a special issue grounded in Canadian Indigenous discourse and worldviews, focusing on nursing’s role in truth and reconciliation, Indigenous health and well-being and the necessity to decolonize nursing in Canada. We warmly welcome three guest co-editors along with elder advisors.

Guest Editors: Dr. Lisa Bourque Bearskin, RN, PhD (Beaver Lake Cree Nation), Dr. Andrea Kennedy, RN, PhD (Settler & Métis ancestry), and Cheyenne Joseph, RN, MPH (Mi'kmaq Nation)

Elder Advisors:

Madeleine Kétéskwēw Dion Stout, RN, MA, Hon. Doctorate (Kehewin First Nation & Tsawwassen First Nation) and Evelyn Voyageur, RN, PhD, Hon. Doctorate (Musgamagw Dzawada’enuxw) .

Please download and share the call for papers by clicking here

 BACKGROUND

Over 370 million Indigenous peoples worldwide remain the most marginalized group enduring significant health inequities that require culturally sovereign actions (WHO, 2019). Health inequities of Indigenous peoples are rooted in colonization and racism. Racism, including racial discrimination and systemic and structural racism are known to negatively impact Indigenous peoples’ health (Allen & Smylie, 2015). The National Inquiry on Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls (2019) accurately identified how genocide has been ongoing for generations. Indigenous families and communities are burdened with carrying and healing from these atrocities and historical trauma. “Genocide by a Million Paper Cuts” (Thorne, 2019) speaks to the importance of truth telling, bearing witness as nursing’s moral and political obligation and essential to advancing social justice nursing. Indigenous peoples are facing confusion amidst ongoing colonization, while looking for insights about the state of their relatively poor health and wellbeing. This is a call for nurses to acknowledge their own position, privilege, and power that intersects with relational practice with Indigenous Peoples, starting with each nurse to critically examine their own practice, and develop insight and actionable strategies to address pervasive ‘othering’ while advancing cultural safety.

Nursing has not done the critical work needed within our discipline to respectfully advance Indigenous Knowledges and Wellness. We are concerned that widespread incentivizing of Indigenization may lead to mining and undermining Indigenous ways of being, knowing and doing. Colonialism will be perpetuated unless we engage in a self-implicated critique (Andreotti, Stein, Ahenakew & Hunt, 2015) for meaningful decolonization in nursing, health education and healthcare. Nursing needs to move past a soft-reform space of mere inclusion and activate positive change that authentically upholds reciprocity with Indigenous communities as central knowledge holders.

Intended Focus of this Special Issue

Intensive efforts to increase the number of Indigenous nurses and contributions from specific Indigenous knowledge systems will contribute to the enhancement of the health of Indigenous communities. Correspondingly, Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse invites contributions to its first special issue to further develop and augment Indigenous health and critically question knowledge development in nursing.

The theme of this special issue was chosen by our esteemed Cree Nursing scholar Dr. Madeleine Dion Stout, who teaches us about the importance Nīpawīstimatowin - “bearing witness for one another. Nīpawīstimatowin is a Cree word that finds expression in the solemnity of an occasion where stories, experiences, data, information, and wisdom are seen, spoken, scripted, and oriented towards improving Indigenous peoples’ health and well-being. While the relationships between Indigenous peoples and nurses often appear immutable and static, in reality, they are subject to a process of more or less constant recognition and a reflection of changing, evolving, and challenging circumstances and contexts. Currently, interest in Indigenous peoples’ conditions, realities, and aspirations is relatively high, along with making central a space for Indigenous peoples to voice their experiences. Furthermore, Dion Stout invites Miyopayowin -“good turns from changing fortunes” - as the aspirational ethos of reconciliation where change lies in transitioning from a conflict-ridden place to one of peace, connectedness and healing. From this ontological perspective, we hold the premise that ‘nursing is in trouble’ is real and is not only being expressed by nurses across the country but also many Indigenous peoples who receive care.

From this position, the call for Canadian nurses and nursing schools to ameliorate the social, health, and healthcare inequities of Indigenous peoples is not necessarily new. What is novel, however, is the sense of urgency this approach is engendering, due to mounting concerns about health disparities, complaints of racism, and calls for recognizing breaches in human rights for Indigenous peoples. The seemingly incompatibility between nurses’ personal experience and how nurses deliver healthcare services needs to be resolved. Nīpawīstimatowin -“bearing witness for one another ” as expressed above will provide the needed tools for decolonization and the political leveraging for truth to give meaning to strategies for change in the expression of what we see, say, write, and do. 

This special issue therefore seeks submissions grounded in Canadian Indigenous discourse and worldviews. Further and more specifically, the journal seeks contributions that critically examine the past, current, and future states of Indigenous peoples in Canada, from a nursing perspective that is consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Submissions may also focus on decolonizing nursing care, nursing policy, nursing education and/or nursing research.

 

Suggested Topics

  • Cultural Humility, Cultural Safety and Cultural Security
  • Jurisdictional Issues including Jordan’s Principle
  • Indigenous Genomics
  • Decolonizing nursing care, nursing policy, nursing education and/or nursing research in Canada
  • Gendered Oppression
  • Indigenous Health Rights
  • Restorative Health Justice
  • Indigenous Data Sovereignty
  • Indigenous Wellness Practice
  • Counteracting Epistemic Racism
  • Indian Hospitals and Medicalization
  • Historical and Intergenerational Trauma
  • Social Justice for Rights Based Healthcare
  • Responses to the TRC Calls to Action in Nursing
  • Indigenous Perspectives: Her/His-stories and Pearls of Wisdom

Note: Student or New Graduate Nurse Voices for Positive Change are welcomed, and such submissions are best supported/mentored by a nursing faculty member.

Guidelines for Authors:

Submissions are to be nurse-authored or if submitted by a team, the lead author must be a nurse. For this special issue, we especially invite submissions from nurse authors who identify as Indigenous. For non-Indigenous lead nurse authors, meaningful authorial inclusion by at least one Indigenous contributor is requested. Prospective authors must also familiarize themselves with the author guidelines set out in the journal found here: https://witness.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/default/about/submissions

Firm Deadline: November 15th, 2019.    All required materials must be submitted through the journal’s online portal found at www.yorku.ca/witness

Prospective authors must register with the journal in order to submit their work.

For any questions including a desire to discuss a proposed submission, please don’t hesitate to contact the journal editor Dr. Cheryl van Daalen-Smith at witness@yorku.ca being sure to cc the lead guest co-editor Dr. Lisa Bourque-Bearskin at lbourquebearskin@tru.ca

 

References

Allan, B. & Smylie, J. (2015). First Peoples, second class treatment: The role of racism in the health and well-being of Indigenous peoples in Canada. Toronto, ON: The Wellesley Institute.

Andreotti, V. D.O., Stein, S., Ahenakew, C., & Hunt, D. (2015). Mapping interpretations of decolonization in the context of higher education. Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, 4(1), 21-40.

National Inquiry Murdered and Missing Women and Girls (2019). Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Retrieved from https://www.mmiwg-ffada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Final_Report_Vol_1a-1.pdf

Thorne, S. (2019). Genocide by a million paper cuts. Nursing Inquiry DOI: 10.1111/nin.12314 Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary-wiley-com.ezproxy.tru.ca/doi/epdf/10.1111/nin.12314

United Nations (2008). United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Retrieved from https://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/DRIPS_en.pdf

World Health Organization (2019). WHO's work on indigenous peoples' health. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/gender-equity-rights/knowledge/indigenous-peoples/en/

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Call for Papers:   "Social Justice Nursing"  Vol 1(2) (2019)

 

Just over a decade ago, the WHO’s (2008) commission on the social determinants of health concluded that social injustice was killing people on a grand scale. With increasing health inequities (i.e. disparities in health and quality of life rooted in marginalization and/or social disadvantage), the role of nursing advocacy to affect social change through practice, leadership, policy and education is crucial. Indeed, the Canadian Nurses Association recently reaffirmed the centrality of social justice as a focus for nursing viewing it as “means to an end and an end in itself,” acknowledging its consistency with the values set out in our code of ethics (CNA, 2010; CNA, 2017). Critical community health nurse, Dr. Benita Cohen (2010) invites nurses in any setting to take four key advocacy steps in order to enact a social justice practice, including: equipping ourselves with the facts, challenging societal beliefs about individual responsibility for health, promoting equity considerations in health policy and program planning within our own organizationand working to bring about social change. To that end, submissions are invited reflecting Social Justice Nursing including any combination of these themes:

 

  • Critical analyses of health inequities and the role of nurses/nursing;
  • Strategies to challenge societal beliefs, policies or health care practices which contribute to the marginalization or victim-blaming of populations experiencing health inequities;
  • Innovations in practice, policy, education or research aimed at promoting social justice and equity;
  • Calls for Action or Lessons Learned from nursing-led social justice activism.

Submissions are to be nurse-authored or if submitted by a team, the lead author must be a nurse.

For author guidelines, please see https://witness.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/default/about/submissions

Firm Deadline for Submission through our online portal: August 15th, 2019

Note: Prospective authors must register with the journal in order to submit their work.

For any questions including a proposed submission, don’t hesitate to contact the editor at witness@yorku.ca

______________________________________________________________________________________

Canadian Nurses Association (2010). Social Justice: A Means to an End. An End in itself. 2nd Ed. Retrieved from:  https://www.cna-aiic.ca/~/media/cna/page-content/pdf-en/social_justice_2010_e.pdf

Canadian Nurses Association (2017) Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses. Retrieved from: https://www.cna-aiic.ca/html/en/Code-of-Ethics-2017-Edition/files/assets/basic-html/page-1.html

Cohen, B. (2010). From witness to social justice advocate. The Canadian Nurse Journal, The last word. September. Retrieved from: https://www.canadian-nurse.com/articles/issues/2010/september-2010/from-witness-to-social-justice-advocate  .

World Health Organization (2008) Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Commission on the Social Determinants of Health. Geneva, Switzerland.  Retrieved from: https://www.who.int/social_determinants/thecommission/finalreport

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Call for Papers: Inaugural Issue 1, Volume 1.

“See*it .... Speak it .... Write it .... Change it ....”

 

In 2010, the Canadian Nurse journal featured Saskatoon health policy scholar Steven Lewis, who wrote of nursing as having many voices, (yet) so little voice, further stating:Nursing’s combination of numbers, reputation and reach should translate into power and influence over how health care is financed, organized and delivered. Yet politically, the profession punches below its weight. The country is the worse for it.”

In response to nursing’s historical “punching below its weight,” we introduce Witness: The Canadian Journal of Critical Nursing Discourse, as an antidote.

There is a rich history of critical discourse and practice in Canada: Discourse and practice gleaned from what Canadian Nurses witness regarding health, health care and the quality of life of individuals, groups and populations. The time has come to formalize a scholarly space for critical nursing discourse that is rooted in such ideas as social justice, intersectionality, advocacy and critical social theory, to name but a few.

Witness readers, editors, and contributors form a collective of critical nurses in Canada and beyond who strive to ameliorate inequities in the health and quality of life of all. By virtue of nursing’s privileged societal position, we witness a wide array of inequities that require us to take action. Our tag line represents the ethos of the journal: “See* it .... Speak it .... Write it .... Change it ....

Witness is a Canadian online open access scholarly nursing journal.Together, contributors and readers form a collective of nurses whose practice, research, teaching and way of being is rooted in social justice.We embrace the open access movement and seek to further dismantle multiple systemic barriers to knowledge creation and dissemination. To that end, no payment to publish nor access the journal’s offerings will be required. The journal is rooted in critical discourse, where the term ‘critical’ refers to a capacity to inquire ‘against the grain.’ It involves a persistent sense of perturbation with the status quo. This is a disposition that involves questioning claims of truth or falsity, charging the thinker with the task of disrupting and destabilizing epistemological certainties, including one’s very own. ‘Critical’ is about recognizing dominant political, economic, and social forces–and interrogating how these influence ways of knowing, the very production of knowledge, and systemic inequities. As both a stance and an action, it is a commitment to the decolonization of knowledge by an analysis of both dominant discourses and oppressive practices. Moreover, ‘critical’ is about a necessity to surface assumptions and tensions in our own and others’ works and practices. It encompasses an unyielding commitment to interrogate the relation of power to knowledge with an understanding that individuals, groups, and systems may–intentionally or unintentionally–reproduce such relations. For Witness, it is a salient attribute that welcomes, and is strengthened by, an openness to perspectival plurality.

To that end, we seek to foster and disseminate critical nursing discourse that is underpinned by the principles of social justice and health equity which interrogate power relations and structural violence, and which aim to advance social change. Submissions may explore advocacy, power, justice, intersectionality, gender, health equity, critical social theory, pedagogies for social change and others.

As an open access, peer-reviewed journal that celebrates critical analyses, practice, policy and action, we know that there are thousands of examples where nursing has found and used its voice to affect change. To that end,our inaugural issue’s theme will reflect the journal’s tag line:“See* it .... Speak it .... Write it .... Change it ....”Our inaugural issue offers space for a wide cross-section of submissions that critically reflect on current and historical nursing concerns and/or examples of advocacy efforts across Canada that seek to dismantle inequities, oppressive practices, and achieve social justice. In this important time of Truth and Reconcilliaction, we especially invite submissions from Indigenous nurses and/or Indigenous scholarship.

The editorial collective welcomes submissions that are language-based and/or arts-informed and wishes to support emerging critical scholarship. In so doing, we invite experienced, emerging and/or nursing student scholars to consider submitting works concerning social justice and advocacy. Together we can affect change.

Submission examples may include but are not limited to:

  • Nurse Activism
  • Examples of/Calls for Resistance in Nursing
    • Anti-Oppression Nursing Efforts: Past or Present
  • Policy Advocacy
  • Disruptive Innovations in Nursing Research, Practice or Education
  • Critical Pedagogy/Education for Social Change
  • Intersectional Analyses of Health or Quality of Life
  • Critical Analyses of Power in the context of Health, Quality of Life, or Nursing
  • Health (In)Equity
  • Social Justice Nursing
  • Decolonizing Nursing
  • Linguistic Hegemony and Resistance
  • Critical Community Health Nursing

Submissions are to be nurse-authored or if submitted by a team, the lead author must be a nurse. Submission formats may include arts-based knowledge translation, practice-based research-based, or review manuscripts.  First-person narrative is welcomed and encouraged. For author guidelines, please see www.yorku.ca/witness. For any questions including to discuss a proposed submission, don’t hesitate to contact us at witness@yorku.ca

Firm Deadlinefor Submission through our online portal: Feb 20th, 2019

Note: Prospective authors must register with the journal in order to submit their work.

 To download the Call for Submissions, please click here

*Rather than imply an ableist bias, “See it…” is intended to incorporate the multiple ways nurses experience/witness injustices.